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doc:howto:usb.i2c-tiny-usb [2012/11/20 22:05]
sancho
doc:howto:usb.i2c-tiny-usb [2013/01/30 06:21] (current)
refack Correction
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===== Introduction ===== ===== Introduction =====
-Several routers and embedded devices with OpenWRT-support are equipped with one or more USB ports. In order to risk your warranty by opening your device and soldering an I²C bus to the GPIOs, you can use an USB-I²C adapter to connect to your I²C-devices (e.g. temperature sensors, RTCs, AD-converters, GPIO-expanders, LCD-Drivers). One of those adapters is called [[http://www.harbaum.org/till/i2c_tiny_usb/index.shtml|i2c-tiny-usb]], developed by Till Harbaum. Biggest advantage is the low price (though not as cheap as the GPIO mod) and the support in the Linux kernel (thus making it possible to connect it to your computer running a recent Linux distribution and test it). Though you need some basic soldering skills, and at the moment you need to build OpenWRT from source.+Several routers and embedded devices with OpenWRT-support are equipped with one or more USB ports. In order not to risk your warranty by opening your device and soldering an I²C bus to the GPIOs, you can use an USB-I²C adapter to connect to your I²C-devices (e.g. temperature sensors, RTCs, AD-converters, GPIO-expanders, LCD-Drivers). One of those adapters is called [[http://www.harbaum.org/till/i2c_tiny_usb/index.shtml|i2c-tiny-usb]], developed by Till Harbaum. Biggest advantage is the low price (though not as cheap as the GPIO mod) and the support in the Linux kernel (thus making it possible to connect it to your computer running a recent Linux distribution and test it). Though you need some basic soldering skills, and at the moment you need to build OpenWRT from source.
===== Compiling the kernel module ===== ===== Compiling the kernel module =====

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doc/howto/usb.i2c-tiny-usb.1353445534.txt.bz2 · Last modified: 2012/11/20 22:05 by sancho